Animation

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Articles on Animation:
   Major in Animation
   A future in Graphic Design
   Art/Animation Major...A Closer Look
   Explore a Major in Animation/Art

Explore a Major in Animation/Art

By Marsha Kearns

photo “In both figure and landscape … I want to get to the point where people say of my work: that man feels deeply, that man feels keenly.” (Letter to Theo van Gogh, 21 July 1882)

 Are you artistic…and what does that mean, exactly?

Generally, it means that you appreciate and have talent in a visual communication medium, such as drawing, painting, sculpting, writing, photography, design, and many more areas. It also means that you feel “deeply and keenly” about your work. To you, art is life. You must create to be truly happy.

Art encompasses many areas, so if you are artistic, you will be able to find the avenue for your creative expression. A major in art will likely encompass a combination of another area of the liberal arts, such as history, English, communications, or business. You may choose a focus in studio art, which is hands-on creation, or study mainly art history.

The relationship between art and culture is strong and art often expresses the ideas and values of a culture. Art has a deep impact on humanity and reflects the history of a people.

How to Think About a Career in Art

The days of needing to market and sell your art in a gallery are gone. That certainly is still a way to make money, but technology has created more venues to sell your art, such as the Internet. Still, a bachelor’s degree will help make you more attractive to most employers.

Begin assembling a portfolio of your work as soon as possible. You will need to show evidence of your talent and skills. In addition, you will need to decide which avenue to follow so you can get the basic education you need to move into your choice of jobs. For example, if you want to teach art, you will need to get a teaching certificate. If you want to be a medical illustrator, you will need to take premedical courses along with art classes.

Choose the creative work that will make you the happiest and most satisfied. Take some business courses so you know how to market and sell yourself: Sell your work to the world at large; Sell your skills as an asset to an employer.

Types of Skills/Attributes

  • imaginative
  • creative
  • critical thinking
  • research skills
  • self-motivated
  • disciplined
  • visual thinker
  • written and oral communication
  • curiosity
  • analytical
  • unique perspective
  • organized
  • turn ideas into reality
  • create associations between ideas
  • multitasking

Types of Jobs/Fields

  • teaching
  • painting
  • art historian
  • advertising agent
  • marketing
  • fashion
  • film editor
  • photographer
  • teacher
  • Web designer
  • gallery director
  • desktop publisher
  • book designer
  • illustrator
  • animator
  • arts administration
  • museum curator
  • art preservation
  • art dealer
  • product and package designer

Self-Assessment

Do I have a talent in an area of art?

Am I willing to spend money on materials and equipment?

Can I accept criticism of my work?

Do I like to experiment with a variety of media?

Do I enjoy spending hours alone in a studio?

Am I willing to learn standard techniques and then develop my own style?

Do I want to learn the history of art and its influence on people and the world?

Am I willing to learn how business works in the art world?

Do I have a strong work ethic that allows me to manage my time, energy, and resources?

Am I willing to learn from mistakes, solve problems, and persevere?

*If you answered “yes” to 7 or more of these questions, a major in Art might be right for you